SUEZ presents its expertise at the International Desalination Association Congress in San Diego this week

SUEZ presents its expertise at the International Desalination Association Congress in San Diego this week

Our mission as the second largest environmental services company in the world is to enable a resourceful future for all. As we said a few weeks ago, the lack of water is the main challenge of the 21st century. That is why SUEZ is making desalination and water reuse a priority. Through our treatment solutions subsidiary Degremont, we are showcasing our expertise this week in San Diego to talk about “Renewable water resources to meet global needs” (IDA 2015 Theme). The IDA Congress takes place every two years and attracts worldwide visitors from the water industry, the universities and the research community. Given the major drought California is facing, the place of the event is a strong symbol. With 40% of the world population living within 60 miles of the coastal area, desalination of seawater is proving to be an essential alternative method for sustainability in urban areas. In 2016, the desalination market is expected to supply 500 million people in drinking water (300 million today) and will also provide water agricultural needs.   With its 250 desalination plant throughout the world, SUEZ supplies 10 million of people with freshwater. Stop by booth #1019 and talk to our experts to discover the benefits of reverse osmosis seawater, demineralized process water for boilers and cooling circuits and so much more! You can also take a look at our conferences program:...
Pennsylvania’s commitment to infrastructure investment benefits environment, economy

Pennsylvania’s commitment to infrastructure investment benefits environment, economy

  Pennsylvania’s state leadership got it right. When Governor Corbett announced the availability of $41.7 million in loans for water infrastructure earlier this year, he was quoted as follows: “The investments that we make today in our environment and economy will improve the quality of life for Pennsylvanians in all corners of the Commonwealth.” In addition to the State’s leadership, Pennsylvania has several water companies that are also able to finance water investments. United Water will do our part, in partnership with the state and communities where we do business, to invest nearly $46 million over the next 5 years in the areas we serve – for reliability purposes. Our customers in several communities including Bloomsburg, Mechanicsburg, Dallas, Hummelstown and the suburbs of Harrisburg will benefit from these reliability investments. Our improvement initiatives are especially timely as changing weather patterns make infrastructure ever more vulnerable to the whims of nature. It should come as no surprise that states which prioritize public investments and seek public-private solutions are able to attract more money than those that don’t. Pennsylvania has not been complacent with the state of its infrastructure for quite some time. A line of Pennsylvania Governors have lead on this issue. In fact, since 1996 Pennsylvania has utilized an infrastructure replacement financing program, a rate mechanism, that has effectively directed private companies like United Water to proactively make major investments to the oldest underground water pipes that are most vulnerable and most likely to cause water main breaks, degradation in water quality and service disruptions. Several states – most recently New Jersey – followed Pennsylvania by enacting a similar program...

Innovating for Water’s Future Roundtable – Opportunities and Solutions for Innovation

The U.S. Water Alliance (USWA) and the Water and Wastewater Equipment Manufacturers Association (WWEMA) recently convened a roundtable of industry leaders to discuss ways to promote the development and adoption of innovative approaches and technologies within the water industry. “Innovating for Water’s Future” was an all day event consisting of three sessions, including an in-depth discussion on opportunities and solutions to innovation. During this session water and wastewater equipment manufacturers, municipalities and public works officials discussed and shared their point-of-view on the biggest opportunities for innovation. According to the findings of a recent survey conducted by WWEMA, the top five opportunities for manufacturers to innovate are: Employ full-cost pricing of water Using “value based” versus “or equal” procurement procedures Address permitting requirements Establish a federal guarantee program for technology replacement Prioritize low cost of ownership in the selection of technologies During the session Federal regulators also offered their perspective on opportunities and solutions for encouraging new technologies. According to the regulators, innovation and new technologies is a priority, not only because of the potential implications for public health and the environment, but also because the development of such new technologies is good for U.S. exports and helps to maintain the nation’s trade surplus. The federal regulators offered some examples of innovation the federal government has developed and/or recognized through awards programs, including a smart phone application with a sensor that provides real-time water quality data; the SWIM, a storm water data calculator; and a pipe leak-detection product currently in use as a pilot program by the Department of Defense. One way the federal government supports innovation is through the...

Innovating for Water’s Future Roundtable – Challenges and Barriers to Innovation

The U.S. Water Alliance (USWA) and the Water and Wastewater Equipment Manufacturers Association (WWEMA) recently convened a roundtable of industry leaders to discuss ways to promote the development and adoption of innovative approaches and technologies within the water industry. “Innovating for Water’s Future” was an all day event consisting of three sessions and began with an in-depth discussion on challenges and barriers to innovation. During this session water and wastewater equipment manufacturers, municipalities and public works officials discussed and shared their point-of-view on the biggest barriers to innovation. According to the findings of a recent survey conducted by WWEMA, the top five barriers to innovation for manufacturers are: The risk-averse nature of the industry The low cost of water Procurement methods that give preference to low cost vs. lowest cost of ownership; Complicated state permitting requirements Buy American restrictions This discussion also focused on the barriers to innovation from the standpoint of municipalities, who are dealing with steep increases in water expenditures. Between 2001 and 2010, local governments spent $864 billion on public water (including both capital expenditures and operations/maintenance). Municipalities continue to face challenges such as such as inflation; population growth and expansion; uncertainty about the economy; and the possibility of a cap being placed on tax-exempt bond financing. Most of these challenges are out of the control of cities and counties, which make it difficult for municipalities to meet their water demands, never mind innovate. The biggest challenge from public work directors’ perspective was the challenge of upgrading facilities without disrupting the community and their own operations. Dismantling, construction and installation of new technologies without interruption of...
Industry Leaders Convene to Discuss Water Innovation

Industry Leaders Convene to Discuss Water Innovation

The U.S. Water Alliance (USWA) and the Water and Wastewater Equipment Manufacturers Association (WWEMA) recently convened a roundtable of industry leaders to discuss ways to promote the development and adoption of innovative approaches and technologies within the water industry. More than 60 policy makers, regulators, manufacturers and industry stakeholders, including Brent Fewell, Senior Vice President of Environment, Health and Safety at United Water and Chair of the U.S. Water Alliance’s Business Advisory Council, attended the roundtable. The roundtable discussion, “Innovating for Water’s Future”, was an all day event consisting of three sessions: Framing the Needs and Challenges to Innovation: The discussion focused on barriers to innovation from the point of view of water and wastewater equipment manufacturers, municipalities and public works officials. Participants of this sessions included Deb Lavelle, Chair, WWEMA; Rich Anderson, Senior Advisor, U.S. Conference of Mayors and Robert Steidel, Director of Public Utilities, City of Richmond (Virginia). Leveraging Existing and Exploring New Opportunities in innovation: The discussion focused on opportunities and solutions from the perspective of manufacturers, state and federal regulators. Participants included Nancy Stoner, Acting Assistant Administrator, Office of Water, U.S. EPA; Suzanne van Drunick and Sally Gutierrez, Office of Research and Development, U.S. EPA; Alex Dunn, Executive Director and General Counsel, Association of Clean Water Administrators and Jim Taft, Executive Director, Association of State Drinking Water Administrators. Facilitated Discussion: The final session focused on additional perspectives from all the participants of the roundtable and was facilitated by Brent Fewell, Senior Vice President of Environment, Health and Safety, United Water....