SUEZ presents its expertise at the International Desalination Association Congress in San Diego this week

SUEZ presents its expertise at the International Desalination Association Congress in San Diego this week

Our mission as the second largest environmental services company in the world is to enable a resourceful future for all. As we said a few weeks ago, the lack of water is the main challenge of the 21st century. That is why SUEZ is making desalination and water reuse a priority. Through our treatment solutions subsidiary Degremont, we are showcasing our expertise this week in San Diego to talk about “Renewable water resources to meet global needs” (IDA 2015 Theme). The IDA Congress takes place every two years and attracts worldwide visitors from the water industry, the universities and the research community. Given the major drought California is facing, the place of the event is a strong symbol. With 40% of the world population living within 60 miles of the coastal area, desalination of seawater is proving to be an essential alternative method for sustainability in urban areas. In 2016, the desalination market is expected to supply 500 million people in drinking water (300 million today) and will also provide water agricultural needs.   With its 250 desalination plant throughout the world, SUEZ supplies 10 million of people with freshwater. Stop by booth #1019 and talk to our experts to discover the benefits of reverse osmosis seawater, demineralized process water for boilers and cooling circuits and so much more! You can also take a look at our conferences program:...
Fix a leak week reminds us of the nexus between infrastructure and securing a resourceful future

Fix a leak week reminds us of the nexus between infrastructure and securing a resourceful future

The rate of treated water that is wasted around the U.S. and the world provides for a shocking statistic: up to half of treated water supplied to urban areas around the world is lost during distribution.   And, closer to home, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reminds us that U.S. households leak 1 trillion gallons nationwide every year.  That’s enough water to supply 11 million homes.   Consider this: every day, approximately 6 billion gallons of water are lost to avoidable leaks––enough water to supply the entire state of drought-stricken California.   During #FixaLeak week, utilities and individuals across the country are encouraging their customers and decision-makers makers alike to think globally and act locally.   As individuals we can all take action to fix that dripping faucet or replace our appliances and showerheads with WaterSense products.   As communities, we need to raise our expectations for infrastructure maintenance and replacement. So frequently, water leaks are out-of-sight and out-of-mind until they spring to life and disrupt order in the form of a costly and wasteful water main break.   So chime in on Twitter at #FixaLeak and add your voice to raise awareness!   As we face a future with increasingly scarce resources, we have to consider the state of our public infrastructure and that which supplies our homes. Our infrastructure is the key to using the resources that we depend upon but it can also be a culprit for unnecessary...
Smarter Water Meter Data Helps to Detect More than 800 Leaks in Bayonne, NJ

Smarter Water Meter Data Helps to Detect More than 800 Leaks in Bayonne, NJ

Water is relatively inexpensive in the context of your overall household budget. On average, the cost of water is less than a penny a gallon. That makes it all too easy to waste. Right now, in your basement or in your backyard, there’s that one spigot that won’t completely shut off. And you’re paying more for water service than you have to as a result. If that sounds familiar, you don’t live in Bayonne, NJ where United Water, has installed over 10,500 new and smarter meters for 90 percent of the city’s residents and businesses. The data from the new meters enables our dedicated customer service team to show and tell homeowners and the Bayonne Municipal Utilities Authority (BMUA) how much water they’re using each day. With real-time data from the new advanced meters, United Water can detect water leaks and quickly inform the customer of the need to take action to prevent a bill spike or worse – property damage that may result from a broken pipe. Meter readers no longer have to walk from door to door resulting in an increased sense of security for homeowners – and we, as a company, no longer have to inconvenience homeowners who would otherwise have to wait at home for a meter-reading appointment. Indeed Bayonne residents have already benefited from the increased information about their water consumption and underground piping that the new meters provide. “We receive regular compliments from customers about the professionalism and follow-through of our employees,” said Chris Riat, United Water senior director of contract operations. “In one instance our customer service supervisor had contacted a resident...
10 Smart Water Tips for Conserving and Living Green

10 Smart Water Tips for Conserving and Living Green

  United Water recently kicked off our annual conservation program with the release of an annual Conservation Guide, a publication designed to promote simple methods of conserving water.  In an effort to optimize other natural resources as well, we have chosen to publish the guide for conserving water as an interactive e-book, available via our website along with 10 tips for smart water use available on local twitter and facebook channels throughout the country.  Due to the high desert climate in Idaho, additional conservation information is available for Boise residents. The guide covers a broad range of topics involving water conservation, and even highlights notable conservation efforts made by local groups over the last year, including work from local high school students. Kathryn Hilburn, a Ninth Grade student at Boise’s North Junior High School, produced the First Place winner in United Water Idaho’s inaugural Summer Conservation Student Video Contest. Hilburn’s entry, titled “Show Water You Care,” was judged to be the video that best communicated a strong conservation message in a clear and easily understood manner. Using simple artwork and narration, Hilburn showed the high value we place on water in our everyday lives and the consequences of wasting the precious resource. In recognition of her achievement, United Water made a $1,500 donation to the Boise Public Schools Education Foundation for her Accelerated Biology class.  Additionally, the video will be aired on local TV stations in Idaho as part of our annual summer water conservation Public Service media campaign. Residential water use spikes across the country during the summer months due to lawn watering.  The publication provides tips and...
Developing sustainably and measuring progress

Developing sustainably and measuring progress

As part of a global environmental and life services company, we recognize that our actions in water, environmental services and waste management have impacts that extend far beyond our daily routine.  Our expertise in optimizing increasingly scarce natural resources faces demands for innovation as populations grow, ecosystems become ever more fragile and society expects and offers more input into resource management decisions. Our employee motto is “Making the planet sustainable is the best job on earth,” and while we carry that with pride, it also comes with a high level of social and environmental responsibility. United Water recently released our annual Sustainable Development Report, which is designed to provide the many communities we serve with information regarding our progress toward social, environmental, and other non-financial goals. We are committed to transparency – and to providing information both on our progress and on areas where additional improvement is needed. We continue to innovatively reduce environmental impact, with results that include a 28.5% increase in energy efficiency since 2009. In the same time frame, we realized a 16.5% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, as well as a 12.4% decline in non-revenue water, or water lost within the distribution system. We’ve also shown progress in other non-financial areas, such as a 40% decline in 2013 alone of workplace accidents that resulted in time out of work. As a major actor of sustainable development in local economies, we must set an example by making a positive impact through our own operations. And we must lead by partnering with municipalities across the country; and encourage them to do the same. We continue to use...
In Tap Water We Trust

In Tap Water We Trust

  In the lead-up to National Drinking Water Week, a news article about French consumer confidence in tap water grabbed our attention. The survey found that 80% of respondents “trust” the water coming from their taps. Similarly 74% of respondents are satisfied with the quality of the water in their home and 69% appreciate the taste. We had incorrectly associated Perrier and Evian with what we assumed to be a bottled water tradition or preference in France. Maybe French spring water isn’t tres chic after all. Maybe Americans are the ones who are hooked on bottled water. Consider this: in recent U.S. surveys, only 53% of municipal water customers said they are likely to drink tap water versus bottled or otherwise filtered water. What gives? In an interview earlier this year with Duke University professor and author James Salzman, the United Water Blog asked this very question. If our water in the U.S. is among the cleanest in the world, why is bottled water so prevalent? The answer, in summary, was that water choices like many other ones, are influenced heavily by marketing. And very good marketing at that: bottled water sells for up to 1,000 times the price of tap water. Salzman found in his research for Drinking Water: A History that since the early 90s when Coke, Pepsi and Nestle entered the bottled water market and the consumption of bottled water skyrocketed, Americans have seemingly had an ambivalent relationship with tap water. Whereas in the 70s, if someone went into a gas station and asked for water they would have been directed to the hose outside. On...