United Water and Nassau County Begin Partnership to Improve Environmental Health of Waterways

United Water and Nassau County Begin Partnership to Improve Environmental Health of Waterways

On January 2, 2015 United Water began a 20-year partnership with Nassau County in the Long Island suburbs of New York City.  Together with the County, United Water will operate and manage three sewage treatment plants and collection system for 1.2 million people.  It is our responsibility to promote a sustainable community in Nassau County and return clean, treated water to surrounding bays and estuaries. United Water also welcomed over 130 county employees.  The employees heard from United Water CEO Bertrand Camus who stressed the importance of this pollution control contract and its promise to improve the quality of life for neighboring residents. County officials reminded the group that local environmental groups have called this project a “reason for hope” and Long Islanders are now looking forward to a day when health is restored to surrounding bays and estuaries and clamming and fishing make a dramatic comeback. Before beginning their duties, employees signed an environment, health and safety pledge to each other and to the communities they are responsible for serving.   Nadine Leslie, United Water Environmental Services President reinforced that while it will certainly take some time to make all the improvements we’re planning, in the end, we will create a state-of-the-art, resilient public service which Nassau County can rely upon. On “Day 1” we were pleased to announce that the project started out having already met an important milestone; already exceeding its guaranteed $10 million in first-year savings to the county by almost $2 million. According to an independent adviser to the county, the project will save Nassau County taxpayers a guaranteed minimum of $230 million during the terms...
United Water Begins Water & Sewer Operations in Borough of Middletown, PA

United Water Begins Water & Sewer Operations in Borough of Middletown, PA

On December 31, 2014, United Water joined the Borough of Middletown, PA community and commenced operations of the water and sewer system. On “Day 1,″  Nadine Leslie, President of United Water Environmental Services welcomed six employees to the United Water Family who had previously worked for the Middletown Borough Authority.  Leslie challenged the employees to “set an example” for environmental compliance and safety for the company which, she emphasized, has deeply rooted values and high standards in these areas. Employees then appropriately underwent health and safety training before ceremoniously accepting their new personal protective equipment (PPE). Shortly thereafter, employees began their hard-hat-clad routine of delivering safe drinking water to Borough residents, and returning cleaned and treated wastewater to surrounding water bodies.                 This team of employees is now part of a larger family with regional, national and global resources.  They’re also part of a landmark deal to make the Borough debt free and set this small college town onto a path of revitalization and prosperity. As part of the concession agreement, a joint venture of KKR and United Water made an initial $43 million payment to the Middletown Borough Authority to retire outstanding debt including an unfunded pension liability for Borough employees.  According to a Borough Official, this will be the first time the Borough is debt free in over 50 years. United Water and KKR have also committed to financing another $83 million in infrastructure improvements throughout the life of the 50-year contract. Indeed 6 underground infrastructure projects are already underway, including ones that will support transportation access to the Penn...
Public investment – minus the politics

Public investment – minus the politics

By Bertrand Camus, United Water CEO  Forty years ago this month, Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water Act to protect public health by regulating the nation’s public drinking water supply. This milestone, which helps ensure that clean, fresh water flows from every tap in America, was created by a shared sense of political vision. Today, that progress is at risk from lack of political ambition to finance infrastructure projects. Ever since November’s mid-term elections, President Obama has worked to put investment in America’s roads, bridges and water systems back on the agenda as a priority that elected officials of all stripes can naturally get behind, saying: “Both parties have been for creating jobs rebuilding our infrastructure.” Visiting China, early December, he marveled at how major construction projects happen. “One thing is that if they need to build some stuff, they can build it,” he said. America can build it, too… Read the complete article on how we can accelerate investment in water infrastructure by tapping untapped funding resources on The Hill Congress Blog:...
United Water and KKR to Bring Water and Sewer Investments to Borough of Middletown, PA

United Water and KKR to Bring Water and Sewer Investments to Borough of Middletown, PA

We are pleased to announce that we will expand our services in Pennsylvania and become part of the growing Middletown Community. We recently announced a partnership with the Borough Authority of Middletown, PA for management and operations of the borough’s water and wastewater system, together with KKR, a leading global investment firm. We already operate five water treatment facilities and over 20 wells serving a population of more than 166,000 people in portions of eight Pennsylvania counties. Our Pennsylvania headquarters are conveniently located in the capital city of Harrisburg. A United Water team dedicated exclusively to Middletown will operate the system for a 50-year term. This partnership marks a growing trend in the U.S. for delivering infrastructure renewal projects for essential public services by drawing upon the strengths and balancing the needs of multiple sectors; both public and private. This joint venture is similar to one that United Water began with the Municipal Utilities Authority in Bayonne, NJ in 2012. The partnership in Bayonne has already delivered valuable infrastructure investments and customer service improvements. Other towns that have created similar partnerships in the recent past include: Rialto, CA and Allentown, PA. Some key features of the Middletown SOLUTION agreement include: • An initial payment to the Middletown Borough Authority of $43 million, which will be used to eliminate the Authority’s existing debt, pension liability and improve its finances. • $83 million worth of infrastructure improvements over the life of the contract. • The Middletown Borough Authority will maintain ownership of the water and wastewater system and will provide oversight of the partnership and its adherence to high quality standards...
Environmental groups hail Nassau County sewer project as a “Reason for Hope”

Environmental groups hail Nassau County sewer project as a “Reason for Hope”

Check out the latest video from the United Water Blog to learn why leading environmental groups are hailing our partnership with Nassau County as a “Reason for Hope.”  Hint: this $1.2 Billion project will deliver benefits to residents, marine life and the environment. United Water In Nassau County from United Water on Vimeo. OUR COMMITMENT TO NASSAU COUNTY: We pledge to sustainably operate and manage the Nassau County Sewage Treatment System in partnership with the County to top environmental and compliance standards and regulations. It will take some time to make all the improvements we’re planning, but in the end, we will create a state-of-the-art, resilient public service which Nassau County can rely...
Tackling water pollution in Nassau County, New York

Tackling water pollution in Nassau County, New York

  In the U.S. there are nearly 16,000 wastewater systems that prevent water pollution by taking in municipal sewage, treating it, and returning it to its natural state. A marvel of the Clean Water Act of 1972, our nation committed to cleaning, preserving and safeguarding its waterways and the aquatic life that depends on them while maintaining an advanced public health system that is of envy to many parts of the world – where 2.4 billion people lack access to sanitation. Indeed during this summer’s World Cup in Brazil, tourists were warned of polluted beaches as only 40% of Rio de Janero’s sewage is treated; the rest is dumped and left to decompose in oceans and lagoons. Aside from the “yuck” factor – anyone who lives near a beach town knows that beach closures can send beach-goers running and long-term pollution can destroy local economies. It’s no wonder that after Hurricane Sandy hit Long Island and the Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant failed to treat tens of millions of gallons of sewage before dumping it into the Western Bays on Nassau County’s South Shore – a coalition of citizen activists, environmental leaders and elected officials decided that it was time to tackle this environmental problem in a serious way. First, Federal, State, County and local elected leaders from New York and Nassau County worked to secure over $800 million in funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to upgrade the plant which is part of a system that treats the sewage of 1.2 million residents of densely populated Nassau County. Then, County Executive Ed Mangano selected United Water...