SUEZ Environnement debuts new North American brand at American Water Works Association trade show

SUEZ Environnement debuts new North American brand at American Water Works Association trade show

As a resource crisis gathers on a global scale, our mission at SUEZ Environnement is to enable a secure, resourceful future for all. In this context, SUEZ Environnement North America, the US and Canadian subsidiary of the second largest environmental services company in the world, is showcasing its North American water, technology and advanced network offerings under the SUEZ Environnement brand at the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Trade Conference this week in Anaheim, CA.  The AWWA Annual Conference is the largest trade show for water industry professionals in the country.   As the water industry well knows, the SUEZ Environnement group has traditionally been organized globally around two major activities: water and waste.  But to rise to global resource challenges, the group’s positioning now focuses on providing solutions, technology and services for municipalities and industries in the entire water cycle and the circular economy and supporting a North American strategy based on four essential pillars: smart water and new services; industry; recycling and waste-to-energy; and investing in infrastructure.   The new position unifies offerings by United Water’s utility and environmental services Degremont’s technology solutions for municipalities and industries and SENA Waste Service’s solid waste recycling and recovery operations in Canada.  All offerings are showcased in one booth #1715 on the AWWA Exhibition floor. Social media followers are invited to engage with @unitedwater which now bears the SUEZ Environnement banner.   Our group vision is to move cities, businesses and industries from an economy that over-consumes natural resources to one that optimizes management and use of resources.  We want to lead the way from resource crisis to resource revolution using technology...
Tackling coastal and ocean pollution on Long Island #WorldOceansDay

Tackling coastal and ocean pollution on Long Island #WorldOceansDay

As managers of coastal wastewater treatment systems, ways to reduce pollution and improve marine habitats are top of mind. On Long Island in Nassau County, NY we are improving the process used to treat wastewater and return clean, non-polluted water to clean water.  But our commitment to Long Island’s waterways doesn’t stop there.  We are working with elected officials and environmental leaders to advocate for an ocean outfall pipe, which would dramatically improve the health of Reynolds Channel and the Western...
SUEZ Environnement Issues Report on North American Sustainable Development Program

SUEZ Environnement Issues Report on North American Sustainable Development Program

On the occasion of World Environment Day, we are pleased to share our 2014 North American Sustainable Development Report which documents progress toward social, environmental and other non-financial goals. Through the SUEZ Environnement sustainability program and this report, we are demonstrating, with actions, that sustainable and socially responsible business is good business – and that good business is better business. Annually, we set goals to make measurable progress towards our vision of moving cities, businesses and industries from an economy that over-consumes natural resources to one that optimizes management and use of resources. And we develop social alliances to help construct and participate in our vision for the future. With each milestone, achieved in collaboration with clients and partners, we are better positioned to lead the way from resource crisis to resource revolution. An ambition to re-imagine our relationship with resources is central to this report which gives an honest assessment of where the company has succeeded and where we fell short of our goals in 2014. We’re pleased to report progress in water recycling and reuse; reducing greenhouse gas emissions; reducing wasted water within our distribution system, among other areas. The company has continually improved upon energy goals, including a 5% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and is on track to achieve a 5% improvement in energy efficiency by 2016. A 1.8% decline in non-revenue water, or water lost within the distribution system, equivalent to saving 1.4 billion gallons for the year was achieved; Amidst record drought across the U.S. the company has a leading edge in reusing 12% of water that would otherwise have been discharged as...
Dam Safety Week Raises Awareness of Infrastructure Upgrade Needs

Dam Safety Week Raises Awareness of Infrastructure Upgrade Needs

    With more than 80,000 dams in the United States – a third of these classified as either “high” or “significant” hazards to both life and property upon failure – Dam Safety Week reminds us all of the importance of infrastructure upgrades and routine maintenance.   While dams are beneficial to many communities in their ability to store drinking water and improve wildlife habitats, they can also act as a dangerous flood risk if failure is reached.  Many dams in the US are approaching their life span of up to 100 years, which makes maintenance a crucial aspect of any dam community, and lack-there-of a major risk to public safety.  Additionally, failures can cost our economy millions of dollars in damages.   For example, from January 2005 to June 2013, state dam safety programs reported 173 dam failures and 587 “incidents.”  Specifically, during the 2013 Colorado floods, after 20 inches of rainfall, six dams failed in one day alone and at least a dozen dams overflowed.  This resulted in an estimated 19,000 damaged homes, a loss of $2 billion in property damage, and ten deaths. Even the recent events of the Texas flooding show how imperative dam safety is. The Padera Lake dam fractured as a result of groundbreaking flooding.  Luckily, despite being on the brink of failure, the dam held.   United Water recognizes the critical nature of dam structures and the imperative need to ensure their integrity. In that light, the company is in the midst of a major safety upgrade at Woodcliff Lake Dam in Bergen County, New Jersey.  The company is raising two reservoir...
A renewed commitment to restoring and protecting biodiversity

A renewed commitment to restoring and protecting biodiversity

In honor of World Biodiversity Day, we are pleased to announce that our commitment to protecting and restoring biodiversity is stronger than ever.  Over the past year, we developed a number of action plans to restore ecosystems and protect threatened and endangered species in and around our water treatment sites.  We operate in over 200 biologically diverse locations where, as leaders in the resource revolution, we take the lead in the environmental health of our surroundings. So what is biodiversity and why is it important to the health of ecosystems? Biodiversity is an important part of making life livable on Earth. It provides us with an array of foods and materials and it contributes to the economy.  Biodiversity also allows for ecosystems to adjust to ever-increasing natural disturbances like extreme fires and floods. So what, then, is a biodiversity action plan and how can an environmental services provider contribute to the improved health of an ecosystem?  An example of one of the action plans we developed this year can be found in Springfield, MA where the Connecticut River runs alongside a wastewater treatment operation that we manage. The Connecticut River watershed encompasses 11,260 square miles, connecting 148 tributaries, including 38 major rivers and numerous lakes and ponds. It is home to many wildlife species, including bear, moose, bobcat, wild turkey, bald eagle, trout, shad, and 10 federally threatened or endangered species. It is also home to New England’s most productive farmlands and to 2 million human residents, about 84% of whom live in or near urban areas including Holyoke, Chicopee, and Springfield, Massachusetts and Hartford, Connecticut. However, many urbanized...